Experiment

In deference to my aging eyeballs I have decided to bump up the font sizes here at Bookworm. I’ll try out a few different configurations here. Please let me know if you have any preferences.

11/16
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

12/16
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

12/18
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

13/18
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

15/18
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

16/19
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

17/20
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

UPDATE: What about Georgia? It’s a serif font designed to be read on screen and everyone supposedly has it.

13/18
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

13/19
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

13/20
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

14/20
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

14/21
The rain was coming down in its old fashion, tapping on a million roofs and occasionally effecting an entry. It beat down the smoke, and caused the fumes of petrol and the smell of wet clothes to linger mixed on the streets of London. In the great forecourt of the Museum it could fall uninterruptedly, plumb on to the draggled doves and the helmets of the police. So dark was the afternoon that some of the lights had been turned on inside, and the great building suggested a tomb, miraculously illuminated by spirits of the dead.

By the way, I suspect this looks much different in IE with ClearType than in Firefox. It looks someting like this:

Fonts

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15 comments on “Experiment

  1. Wil Cone says:

    My two cents:
    #1 = 11/16
    #2 = 12/18

  2. Stefanie says:

    I like 12/18 a lot. And 13/18 is good too.

  3. JaneFan says:

    12/18 and 15/18 seem easiest to read.

  4. dan says:

    My eyes must be a bit older, I'd opt for the 13/18 or 12/18.

  5. Xensen says:

    Let's think about this. You have four sans serifs in smaller typesizes and three serifs in larger typesizes. The serifs default to Times, probably, which is a narrower face, so they have a higher character/inch count.
    Your sans serif measures break down into roughly the following number of characters per line (counting spaces):
    11 = 80
    12 = 70
    13 = 60
    Your serif measures break out like this
    15 = 77
    16 = 74
    17 = 66
    Now, you could go to an 80 character measure but if you did you would need a lot of leading or readers will get lost finding the start of the next line. Personally, I would not go beyond 72. So I would throw out your 11 and 15 pt. choices, unless you can increase your measure a little.
    Your 13 pt choice gets barely 60 chars/line. With that few characters you might not need 18 point leading. If you want to keep the 13 point type (I like it), I think you should try reducing the leading a point or two and see how it looks. (I'm not certain it would be better.)
    The 12 pt sample gets too many chars/line to tolerate only 16 pts lead, so the 12/18 looks and reads better. I also think over 20 is too little for the 17 pt sample.
    The following of your samples would be my preferences: 12/18, 13/18, or 16/19.
    Of course, it all depends on what else is happening on the page. For example, 16/19 might overpower your other elements.

  6. Michelle says:

    I was thinking 12/18 or 13/18 also. And it looks like Xensen has explained in wonderful detail just why. πŸ˜‰

  7. 11/16 is fine by me but I know it's not easy to be read by old eyes.
    Final 12/18 is my pick, the leading is better than 12/16.
    Somehow the serif looks funny to me, I don't think you like the serif anyways so that's a mute point.
    Happy Modifying!
    Jessica

  8. Wil Cone says:

    You could also create multiple style-sheets and let the reader choose among them.

  9. Sylvia says:

    Thanks for the feedback, especially Xensen for the technical analysis. I think 12/18 is the winner. It looks the best to me too.
    Other design feedback is definitely welcome. I want this blog to be visually hospitable.

  10. Andrew says:

    I have to say that I'm not too keen on the centre column and title – it being white, it's not as 'warm' and 'inviting' as it was 😦
    Regarding the fonts – I like Georgia 14/20. I usually prefer serif, but admit they're not as easy to read. What font is used for the 2 'outside' columns with the links?

  11. Sylvia says:

    I'm not crazy about that banner either. Back to the drawing board…
    I've heard that serif fonts are easier to read as text, but I'm not sure if that translates on-screen, especially without ClearType. With ClearType the Georgia looks gorgeous!
    The sidebars use Verdana 10px. I might up those as well.

  12. Wil Cone says:

    Personally, I'm not a big fan of ClearType (not crisp enough, too fuzzy/blurry), but it's definitely not just an IE thing, it works system-wide (in Firefox too).
    And I like your old banner too (glad to see it back :-).

  13. Sylvia says:

    That's funny, ClearType doesn't seem to work in my version of Firefox. I suppose I need to get another extension… [eye roll]
    I guess if the banner ain't broke I shouldn't fix it!

  14. Wil Cone says:

    IE7 comes with ClearType turned on by default. You can turn ClearType on for your system as a whole (including Firefox) by going to Control Panel > Display > Appearance > Effects > “Use the following method to smooth edges of screen fonts:” > ClearType.

  15. Sylvia says:

    Ah, OK, thanks.

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